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Excerpt from "Bully Solution"







Super Hero Within

You were ‘born that way’... whatever your strengths and specialness is... it’s yours to cherish, to develop, and to share with the world. In moments of doubt, when needing to muster courage, to brave the storm of taunts, and misunderstanding. - Either you face a fear or run from it. In “Peace Smarts” we ‘Morph It’ and transform fear into constructive energy.  Clarity emerges, you won’t be so lost or stuck, trying to be someone you aren’t, trying to fit in, or to please someone else.


Imagine Hero Inside Of You


  • See their Image in as much detail, as you can.  A warrior type, wise sage, a funny munchkin.
  • What qualities do they possess? Courage, gentleness, follow through, kindness, humor? 
  • Fill yourself with the qualities that you admire. And watch how other people respond to the positivity.
  • Take a Smile with you each day and see what comes back... Smiling faces.   


HOPE - Having Optimum Potential Eternally
              

How To Cope With A Disaster      

Dr. Caren Caty, Ph.D.

Senior Fellow- Children’s Innovation Institute

Many people are experiencing powerful feelings related to the tragedies that occur daily. There are healthy and unhealthy ways to express emotions. Children are especially vulnerable to a powerful display of emotion from adults and the chaotic atmosphere that can create. Therefore, adults can help children by remaining calm and attentive when children are present. While it is important to try and keep the daily routine as normal as possible, there may also be the need for added comfort during this extraordinary time of stress.


Adults can comfort children by:


  1. Talking, Hugging, Playing, Strolling, Riding Bikes, Reading Books, Watching Movies, etc. with children.
  2. Coming home from work and greeting a child with a smile, stating enthusiastically, “It is so good to see you! How are you?” This sends a positive message of caring and concern, and can be especially beneficial for disconnected and withdrawn pre- teens and teenagers. Whether or not there is an immediate response from the child, an important positive message is passed from the adult to the child and will resonate in that child’s brain.
  3. “I love you” is among the most comforting phrases (especially powerful with a hug).
  4. Taking notice of the positive actions that occurred during the disaster, such as people helping each other, and police, doctors and others readily available to take care of those in need.
  5. Complimenting positive things a child does and eliminate criticism.
  6. Preparing a favorite meal.
  7. Encouraging and modeling hugging, petting, walking, or just watching TV with the family pet(s).
  8. Teaching children to “stop and smell the roses,” or point out something beautiful in their surroundings.
  9. Letting children know that you trust them to be alert and do the right thing when you are not there to protect them.
  10. Empathy (understanding the thoughts and feelings of others) is the cornerstone of a compassionate society. This tragedy provides an opportunity to express empathy and be motivated to help bring comfort to others. Some children understand the concept of being the best they can be in honor of those who were harmed and had their lives greatly impacted by tragedy.


This point of view promotes feelings of gratitude in the child for what they have and motivation to help others less fortunate. Community service involvement is a great way to transform your feelings into positive actions. People of all ages can take part in volunteer activities. Even very young children can participate in a beautification project at their school, such as planting a garden.

Practice 'What It Means' To Be A Friend

 Give compliments... that you feel are true. “You are a great ball player.”  “Could you show me how you pitch that ball so good?” Accept a compliment - know you are worthy.

Be respectful and kind. Go out of your way to help someone, maybe you are the one who can help with a math problem.

 Lend a listening ear. Show you care, have empathy for someone who is left out, having family problems.

 Don’t hold on to the small stuff. Let irritations roll off your back. You know how people that are always complaining are not fun to be around. Choose to stay on the task at hand and ignore what isn’t your business.

 Focus on what is going right, rather than on what is going wrong. Choose to share the positive, and watch how people respond to you. You can uplift energy, and feel good.

 Accept others as they are. You can’t change them. Be less critical; enjoy the finer traits someone has. Build people up.  Dwell on your good points, live them, uplift yourself and others.